HumanitiesDC
   

Humanities DC Awards $60,000 to 20 Programs for Cycle 1 Grants!

June 3, 2014

congratulationsCongratulations to each of the residents and organizations who applied and received Cycle 1 grants from The Humanities Council of Washington, DC. Twenty projects received $60,000 in grant funding. Learn more about our new grantees and how their projects will enrich our Nation’s Capital below!

 

All Souls Housing Corp, “Mapping Segregation in Washington DC”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 1

Event Location: Ward 1, 2, 4

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

This project’s goal is to visually display—using a layered, dynamic, interactive online map—the historic segregation of Washington, DC’s housing and schools, recreation centers, and other public facilities. The map will serve as the central element of a website that will also include one or more interpretive essays, photographs, and other relevant content.

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Chowan Discovery Group, “Mary Gibson Hundley Documentary”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 4

Event Location: Ward 1, 2, 4, 5

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

 

This project is a 15-22 minute video documentary about a highly dedicated teacher at the Paul Lawrence Dunbar High School who taught from 1920 to 1955.  Her name is Mary Gibson Hundley.  Mrs. Hundley held students and herself to high academic standards, and encouraged many at Dunbar to attend the best possible colleges in the United States during the Jim Crow era.

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Community Resources Incorporated, “A Loud Silence: Visual Cues on the Underground Railroad”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 1

Event Location: All Wards

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

 

Maps from the 1740’s- 1865 will depict the District as it was; Phase Two will involve site visits to identified locations of sites on the UGRR. These sites will be described and art work depicting their existence and involvement using “the Code” will be made.

The project will provide a contextual narrative that researches sites, describes the land, and the interaction between travelers and conductors on the UGRR. The narrative will be used to create a catalogue and a video for inclusion in the Humanities Council library.

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DC Youth Orchestra Program, “DC Youth Orchestra History Video and Website”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 6

Event Location: 6, 2, web based

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

 

DC Youth Orchestra Program (DCYOP) has a rich legacy, not just musically, but as being a part of the District of Columbia’s history. The purpose of this project is to create a video and website that shares stories from DCYOP’s history and also provide a platform to today’s students so that they have a better understanding of today.

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Diversity Theatre Co., “Kings of Kulture and Kush”

Target Population: African American

Humanities Discipline: Anthropology

Organization Location: MD

Event Location: All Wards, web based

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

 

The meaning of the production, “Kings of Kulture & Kush” comes out of the unknown historical origins of Africa. “Kush” (Africa) was named many names by the people who live on the continent. The “Kings” position reflects the cultural duties, beliefs and responsibility of man’s character. Also, it’s a display of how he was raised to serve his family and nations of people.  Over the years, the people of Africa display many unknown cultural influences that they originally had on other cultures.

 

The purpose of the production is to bridge the gap between generations of Black men. This artistic performance will empower men to build community through a continuing dialogue. The goal is to dispel myths, stigmas, learned behavior and stereotypes through the artistic interpretation of the cast. This will help black men to become aware of their choices and different circumstances.  We want the audience to become diligent in their daily endeavors so they pursue their independent goals in a positive manner.

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Docs In Progress, “Decade of Docs DC”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: MD

Event Location: Ward 1, 2

Amount Awarded: $3,000

 

Project Summary

 

Decade of Docs DC is a film screening showcase for 10 short and feature-length documentary films which highlight Washington DC communities, histories, residents, cultures, and customs. The films have all been work shopped through Docs In Progress which is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2014.

 

The festival will take place over two days in October 2014. While it will take place at a screening space in Ward 1 or 2, the festival will be Metro-accessible and promoted to Washington DC citizens from all Wards.

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Festivals DC, Ltd., “2014 “Meet the Artist Event with Marc Cary”

Target Population: African American

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 2

Event Location: Ward 8

Amount Awarded: $2,000

 

Project Summary

 

The DC Jazz Festival’s “Meet the Artist” engagement will pair renowned jazz pianist and composer Marc Cary with poet and moderator E. Ethelbert Miller, resulting in a fascinating dynamic onstage. Miller will provide an historical context to Cary’s work, which is rooted in Washington, DC’s go-go music scene and fuses with jazz to Indian classical music to Malian music to hip-hop. The event will take place on June 25, 2014 at the Anacostia Playhouse at the Anacostia Playhouse, which offers exciting programming to communities east of the Anacostia River.

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From Block2Block, “Anacostia Audio Storytelling Project”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 3

Event Location: 5, 8, web based

Amount Awarded: $2,500

 

Project Summary

 

This project will take From Block2Block into Anacostia to report on the changing neighborhood. They will collect 20 one-hour oral histories, curate the interviews into an audio documentary, adapt the piece for a stage production and perform the production in community spaces in the Anacostia neighborhood and beyond.

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I SAW! DC, “Discovering Sacred Ground & Treasuring Our Past”

Target Population: Children and Youth

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 1

Event Location: web based, all wards

Amount Awarded: $2,500

 

Project Summary

 

I SAW! The Experience of Learning Global Communities is an organization serving Washington DC youth who are overcoming historically social and economic challenges in its program named I SAW! DC.

 

I SAW! DC’s youth summer researchers from Wards One through Eight will engage in I SAW! DC’s 2014 intergenerational community based education project, “Discovering Sacred Ground & Treasuring Our Past.”

 

Approximately four youth leaders will plan and lead 12 summer youth researchers with mentors in their investigation of the legacy and contributions of African Americans involved within the founding communities of DC’s earliest African American churches such as Mt. Zion Methodist Church in Georgetown and the Fifteenth Street Presbyterian Church within the surrounding area of DC during June 30 through August 8th, 2014.

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PEN/Faulkner Foundation, “PEN/Faulkner Summer Book & Supper Club, 2014”

Target Population: Children and Youth

Humanities Discipline: Literature

Organization Location: Ward 6

Event Location: Ward 6

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

 

The Summer Supper & Book Club is a seven-week program that will provide students with access to high quality literary programming during the summer months. Weekly meetings will feature a shared dinner, free books, collective conversation about a shared text, and a wide-ranging conversation with a local author whose work the students have read.

 

This program is a direct extension of PEN/Faulkner’s core mission, which is to inspire and sustain a creative and literate society. There are few better ways to accomplish this mission than through the rigorous, communal introduction of young people to high-quality literature, complemented by roundtable conversations with the authors of those works. Students will be encouraged to read and dissect texts, voice opinions, question authorial choices, and connect their own reading experiences and lives to the work of the authors they meet each week. In this way, PEN/Faulkner will convey—both in idea and in practice—the personal value that comes of rigorous intellectual engagement with the world around us.

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Washington Architectural Foundation, “Washington Architectural Foundation Youth Programs”

Target Population: Children and Youth

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 2

Event Location: All wards

Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

Project Summary

 

Washington Architecture Center Youth Programs give District youth the opportunity to explore the humanities in an exciting real-life, project-based way.

 

ARCHITECTURE in the SCHOOLS is a highly successful curriculum-enrichment program that brings design professionals into about 30 District of Columbia Public School classrooms each year. Architects lead neighborhood walks and children learn about the history and character of buildings and public spaces that make up the distinctive fabric of their communities. Additionally, children gain an understanding of Washington DC outside the boundaries of their own neighborhoods including the Monumental Core. And finally, they broaden their understanding of the humanities by learning about cultures and city design around the world.

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2014 Cycle I Small Grants Description List

 

Total Amount Awarded: $5,000

 

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Bowie State University, “Washington, D.C.’s African American Public Relations Trailblazers”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: MD

Event Location: Web Based

Amount Awarded: $1,000

 

Project Summary

 

We will conduct an oral history project on Washington, D.C.’s African American public relations trailblazers, those who have achieved significant accomplishments through their work. Such accomplishments may include advancing the profession, facilitating change in organizations or the public arena–particularly the progress of African Americans, or wielding a high level of influence in the nation’s capital.  Under the direction of Rochelle R. Daniel, Coordinator of Public Relations and Instructor in the Department of Communications at Bowie State University, a group of public relations students over a one-year period will conduct interviews with veteran public relations professionals and others who may be considered trailblazers or who were mentored by those who were trailblazers.  The interviews will be transcribed and compiled in a repository, which will support further research in the field of public relations.

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Day Eight, “Preserving DC’s Brilliant Heritage: The Washington Color School”

Target Population: Children and Youth

Humanities Discipline:  Art History/Criticism

Organization Location: Ward 4

Event Location: Ward 1, 2

Amount Awarded: $1,500

 

Project Summary

 

The DC Student Arts Journalism Challenge is a competition for local students that identifies and supports talented young arts writers. In its third year drew over thirty applicants, including submissions from all of the local universities.

This project supports the competition through creation of a resource packet of arts criticism documenting the Washington Color School. This packet will be provided as an example to future arts writers, and serve as focus of a public event about the relationship of critics and the Washington Color School. The project will be directed by Arts Journalism Challenge project director Robert Bettmann, and Philip Kennicott will serve as project scholar. Philip Kennicott is the Washington Post’s culture critic, and winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for criticism.

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Funk Parade, “Funk Parade”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 1

Event Location: Ward 1

Amount Awarded: $1,000

 

Project Summary

 

Funk Parade is a one-of-a-kind street fair, parade and music festival for the U Street neighborhood, on May 3, the 211th anniversary of the city’s incorporation.

The Funk Parade street fair (noon-5): The neighborhood teems with music and performance, artists and vendors, food and art, workshops and spontaneous acts of soul.

Funk Parade  is a one of a kind street fair, parade, and music fest aimed at paying tribute to DC cultural arts and music, the historic U Street Neighborhood and the Spirit of Funk.  Funk Parade exists to make good things happen by bringing people together and creating opportunities to recognize and honor a shared spirit through music, dance and the visual arts.

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Stone Soup Films, “Kramer & Sons Documentary Film”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 2

Event Location: Ward 1, 2, 5

Amount Awarded: $1,500

 

Project Summary

 

Opening its doors in 1801, Northeast DC’s Union Market was once the largest market of its kind in the country. For nearly two centuries it has served as one of the District’s most significant hubs of local food distribution and multicultural family businesses. Kramer & Sons, a new documentary by DC-based production company Meridian Hill Pictures, will inform District residents about the important history of this essential institution, helping to preserve its legacy and cultural role in the community.

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2014 Commemoration and Remembrance Grants Description List

 Total Amount Awarded: $4,000

 

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AIA Legacy dba AIA Foundation, “Traveling Trunk: Uncovering Washington DC’s War of 1812 Stories”

Target Population: Children and Youth

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 2

Event Location: All wards

Amount Awarded: $2,000

 

Project Summary

 

The Octagon seeks funding to support an educational collaboration with the National Park Service President’s Park.  In this, the bicentennial year of the War of 1812’s pivotal events in the Washington DC region, the Octagon and President’s Park will work together to create a teaching tool to bring the region’s students closer to the people, places, and events of August 1814 – February 1815.

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Arts for Our Children, Inc., “Nannie Helen Burroughs 135th Birthday Party”

Target Population: African American Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 4

Event Location: Ward 4

Amount Awarded: $2,000

 

Project Summary

 

We will be a birthday party for Ms. Burroughs celebrating her birthday including picnic lunch and cake. Each family will receive a commemorative gift bag including a photo of Dr. Burroughs, her speech on girls, and a handkerchief. There will be performances by the iThings 2 Collard Greens campers including song, dance poetry. Attendees will be from the community and the campers and families that have attended the camp.

Recently, the Nannie Helen Burroughs School in NE closed.  It is imperative that we keep her legacy alive and her contributions to the Washington, DC community. Ms. Burroughs was an example of the importance of industrial training and the liberal arts with a Christian Education.

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DC Independent Film Festival, “Remembering the MacArthur Theater and neighborhood movie-going”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline:  History

Organization Location: Ward 3

Event Location: Ward 3

Amount Awarded: $2,000

 

Project Summary

 

‘Remembering the MacArthur Theater and Neighborhood Movie-Going” celebrates the 51-year social and cultural role of a neighborhood movie theater in DC’s residential Palisades (Ward 3). The MacArthur Theater was an important neighborhood theater from December 25, 1946 until it became a CVS store in 1997, retaining the external architecture but none of the internal fittings except the entrance. The theater was a central gathering place, serving the neighborhood and shaping social life and identity. The MacArthur Theater is characteristic of the theaters that were once prominent in the city’s outlying commercial centers and which have largely disappeared today. Such places of popular entertainment, convenient by car and removed from downtown congestion, help illustrate the city’s social history and suburban expansion.  Going to the Movies” has been an integral part of DC life for generations: the young have had their first dates in movie theaters, children have seen their first glimpses of other countries, audiences have shared screen experiences and movie theaters have been neighborhood meeting places.

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Smithsonian Institution, “How the Civil War Changed Washington”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 8

Event Location: Ward 8

Amount Awarded: $2,000

 

Project Summary

 

“How the Civil War Changed Washington” is a research-based initiative that examines how the American Civil War forever changed the city of Washington, D.C. The research will result in an exhibition with accompanying public programs at the Anacostia Community Museum (ACM) from October 27, 2014 through September 21, 2015. The focus of inquiry is on the social and spatial impact of the war such as changes in social mores, the built environment, the population and its ethnic breakdown, and new collective uses of wartime elements, including the many Civil War forts constructed around the city were later turned into parks. This project falls under the aspect of the ACM research mission that focuses on the urban communities and the built environment. It will also comprise ACM’s participation in the Smithsonian Institution’s broader commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in 2014. One of the major themes of the research and of the exhibition will be to relate the outcomes of the Civil War to the resulting, and lasting, changes to the city of Washington that are still evident today. This connection will give viewers not only the historical context of events, but also a personal connection to the content. Additionally, a central component of the exhibition is the histories of select local individuals and families whose personal stories relate to the larger historical context. The project will demonstrate the ways in which this turning point in US history was significant to the evolution of its capital city.

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Women in Film & Video, “Painted City”

Target Population: General Population

Humanities Discipline: History

Organization Location: Ward 5

Event Location: Ward 1, 2, 7, 8

Amount Awarded: $2,000

 

Project Summary

 

There is a story behind every mural. They represent a community’s identity, inspire reflection, express collective experiences, and add color to the city.

 

When demolition equipment starting looming over two of the murals near my neighborhood, I started wondering about the temporary nature of outdoor public art. When a building with a mural is demolished or deteriorates, what does the community lose? Can anything be done to save it? How could a mural’s story–its origin, meaning, and evolution–be preserved?

 

These questions surround many of the city’s murals. A mural of Frederick Douglass at 12th and Massachusetts was covered by a new luxury apartment building constructed next to it. The “Black Family Reunion” on 14th and Florida is facing a similar fate as it slowly starts to be covered. A Columbia Road mural that celebrated the neighborhood’s Latino heritage with three colorful parrots was demolished last fall to make way for condos. And the iconic U street mural of Duke Ellington is no longer overlooking “Black Broadway”–it has been in a storage facility for over a year.

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